Kirk's cogitations

Random thoughts from an omnologist...
marksbirch:

Every so often in my web ramblings, I come across an interesting tidbit.  While not meant to be an endorsement of Automattic, I find it interesting that a company with such a huge impact on the Internet has 113 employees total and is not constrained by geography.  While not quite the 12 person, $1 billion tech company I wrote about last year (and which Instagram was so gracious to prove), it is quite an impressive feat.
Massive teams with extraneous resources not directly adding value to the products these companies create are going to be a thing of the past.  I could not honestly tell you what 75% of the employees at Oracle, Microsoft, Google, and the like are doing.  These are companies with teetering org charts filled with people that exist only to justify their own existence and make imaginary work for others.  The result is that the products produced over time are simply not that great.
Forget about starting all lean startup then binge hiring to scale the company.  That is the slow boat to Bloatsville, management bureaucracy, product stagnation, and shitty HR employee manuals.  Size is simply puts a chokehold on innovation and stifles independent thought.  Start lean and stay lean and never hire for the sake of hiring even if the pull of snagging an “A player” infects your thinking* or your investors push you to hire in order to take the market advantage.
* There are no A players, that is a bit of myth-busting I plan to drop this week.

marksbirch:

Every so often in my web ramblings, I come across an interesting tidbit.  While not meant to be an endorsement of Automattic, I find it interesting that a company with such a huge impact on the Internet has 113 employees total and is not constrained by geography.  While not quite the 12 person, $1 billion tech company I wrote about last year (and which Instagram was so gracious to prove), it is quite an impressive feat.

Massive teams with extraneous resources not directly adding value to the products these companies create are going to be a thing of the past.  I could not honestly tell you what 75% of the employees at Oracle, Microsoft, Google, and the like are doing.  These are companies with teetering org charts filled with people that exist only to justify their own existence and make imaginary work for others.  The result is that the products produced over time are simply not that great.

Forget about starting all lean startup then binge hiring to scale the company.  That is the slow boat to Bloatsville, management bureaucracy, product stagnation, and shitty HR employee manuals.  Size is simply puts a chokehold on innovation and stifles independent thought.  Start lean and stay lean and never hire for the sake of hiring even if the pull of snagging an “A player” infects your thinking* or your investors push you to hire in order to take the market advantage.

* There are no A players, that is a bit of myth-busting I plan to drop this week.

Empirically, it’s not just for other people that you need to start small. You need to for your own sake. Neither Bill Gates nor Mark Zuckerberg knew at first how big their companies were going to get. All they knew was that they were onto something. Maybe it’s a bad idea to have really big ambitions initially, because the bigger your ambition, the longer it’s going to take, and the further you project into the future, the more likely you’ll get it wrong.

I think the way to use these big ideas is not to try to identify a precise point in the future and then ask yourself how to get from here to there, like the popular image of a visionary. You’ll be better off if you operate like Columbus and just head in a general westerly direction. Don’t try to construct the future like a building, because your current blueprint is almost certainly mistaken. Start with something you know works, and when you expand, expand westward.

The popular image of the visionary is someone with a clear view of the future, but empirically it may be better to have a blurry one.

(via sarahjuddwelch)

(Source: paulgraham.com, via sarahjuddwelch)

(Source: clitorisms, via fuckyeahyoga)

(Source: pushthemovement)

anillegiblemess:

It. Kills. Me.

anillegiblemess:

It. Kills. Me.